LUKE STOCKDALE

everything that comes after — with Nashville's Aussie creative director

LUKE STOCKDALE

everything that comes after — with Nashville's Aussie creative director

BY CARIANN BRADLEY – PHOTOS BY JORDAN BENTON – APRIL 26, 2019

Midnight Woman Moon

Luke Stockdale is a creative director born and raised in Australia. He's the owner of Sideshow Sign Co., a reputable design studio in Nashville, Tennessee. I worked for him in 2017, shortly after graduating college; over the last two years I've had the privledge of learning more of what lies beneath his unequivocal creativity — a significant past and story. I hope you can glean something from hearing his story, just as I have. *Please note that this story mentions abuse, suicide, and mental illness. If you need professional resources regarding these topics, see here.

Luke Stockdale is a creative director born and raised in Australia. He's the owner of Sideshow Sign Co., a reputable design studio in Nashville, Tennessee. I worked for him in 2017, shortly after graduating college; over the last two years I've had the privledge of learning more of what lies beneath his unequivocal creativity — a significant past and story. I hope you can glean something from hearing his story, just as I have. *Please note that this story mentions abuse, suicide, and mental illness. If you need professional resources regarding these topics, see here.

Luke Stockdale is a creative director born and raised in Australia. He's the owner of Sideshow Sign Co., a reputable design studio in Nashville, Tennessee. I worked for him in 2017, shortly after graduating college; over the last two years I've had the privledge of learning more of what lies beneath his unequivocal creativity — a significant past and story. I hope you can glean something from hearing his story, just as I have. *Please note that this story mentions abuse, suicide, and mental illness. If you need professional resources regarding these topics, see here.

Luke Stockdale is a creative director born and raised in Australia. He's the owner of Sideshow Sign Co., a reputable design studio in Nashville, Tennessee. I worked for him in 2017, shortly after graduating college; over the last two years I've had the privledge of learning more of what lies beneath his unequivocal creativity — a significant past and story. I hope you can glean something from hearing his story, just as I have. *Please note that this story mentions abuse, suicide, and mental illness. If you need professional resources regarding these topics, see here.

CARIANN: So I think I’ve told you what I’m trying to do with the magazine. It’s to encourage the people that are submitting anonymously...almost like a resource. I’ve encountered a lot of people who go to the Midnight Woman site and want to share something but still can’t do it. I talked a bit in Hayley’s interview about it — the stakes are still super high, which sucks — so interviews like yours serve as a resource to encourage people who don’t know how to express themselves or don’t know how to put words to what’s happened to them, whether it’s good or bad.


I don’t really know much about your story or your background. I’ve heard pieces but, just whatever you wanted to talk about I’m good with.


LUKE: I mean, I just have a story. It’s not a highly unusual story but it shaped who I am today; it’s what created the pallette for the kind of struggles I continue to have. I still have a  good life, it’s just been bloody hard. And I’m assuming you don’t want to be talking about sign-making. [Laughs]


C: I mean, I think it’s important to consider what you do for a living.


L: But I mean, it’s not like a design article. This is like a human-interest piece?


C: Right. It’s about you, and I am interested in how your story has affected your creativity. Is that what made you an artist? Your siblings and your mom are super creative too.


L: I think they made me an artist. I think my sister was born an artist. It’s all interconnected. If we hadn’t all witnessed something together, we wouldn’t have such a bond. I wouldn’t have wanted to be like my sister or my brother. We’re very tight, very close.


C: How many of you are there?

L: Four. The closest one to me in age is ten years older than me. We all saw and experienced the same thing in different ways. And also we mostly grew up with one parent — well, I did, I grew up with one parent —ever since Dad ceased to be involved in family at all, which is probably when I was ten or twelve, we’ve been a single-parent family. He was never allowed to talk to me. He would be now, since I’m an adult, but yeah. My siblings had on-off contact with him over the years, but all eventually shut him out of their lives.


C: But you haven’t talked to him?

L: I haven’t talked to him in probably 15 years. I’ve never had an adult conversation with him. There’s just too much shit, and he’s never wanted to. At least that’s my impression. He would have been able to contact me after I turned 16, he’s just never done so. He’s never tried to reach out to me or anything. Which is, I don’t know...like if I had a kid, if I had a son, [not reaching out] does not compute with me. I don’t have a son, but I can’t relate to his way of thinking on that at all. Just that sort of dismissive, “Yeah, I’ve got a son somewhere, I don’t know where he is in the world, if he’s married or alive.” I just don’t understand it.


C: Do you think he genuinely doesn’t think about it or he’s ashamed or embarrassed?


L: Who knows? He’s never taken accountability for what he’s done. He’s never acknowledged it, except maybe in times where he’s broken down. But yeah, it’s probably a fair bit of shame. I mean, he was criminally indicted for sexual abuse and domestic violence. My sister and I were awarded compensation by the government; it’s called Victim of Crimes Compensation. There was a trial, there was everything.


C: How old were you then?


L: Then, probably seven or eight during that period of time. Which was sort of...I was being sexually abused pretty often. We don’t actually know how long, and I can’t remember [the sexual assault] at all, but my sister found out. She was the only sibling at home. Dad was so violent, that the other two siblings, when they were old enough to go to boarding school, they just shipped off. It just ended up being me and my next oldest sister. We were still too young to leave.


She got to spend a lot of time with me back then and noticed things. I would go into a room with dad and would come out screaming, or I’d just be really upset. I’d draw pictures of grown men’s penises — just things I really shouldn’t have known about back then. She would encourage me like asking questions of what we were doing.


I drew as a kid, and that’s still how I communicate. I’m not great conversationally, it’s more of a visual thing for me. I was able to draw these scenarios she could interpret. In my drawings, I’d draw my sister in one room of the house watching a TV show, say “Wheel of Fortune,” and I would draw myself in another room with darkness, probably naked, I don’t remember. All these drawings were collected for the court case and then got burned later. So she was able to be like, “On this day I was watching ‘Wheel of Fortune’ — I remember this specific day — and that moment when dad took Luke into a room, every single other detail in the drawing matches what happened. And then I remember Luke being upset for the rest of the day, not wanting to leave my side.” She was my person during this. She would sort of hold me to sleep and stuff.

It’s very, very serious to abuse people. It is a serious crime because you are affecting people and how they deal with every single thing for the rest of their life. You know? It’s not just like that moment when they were being traumatized — that’s not what it’s about — it’s about everything that comes after.

It’s very, very serious to abuse people. It is a serious crime because you are affecting people and how they deal with every single thing for the rest of their life. You know? It’s not just like that moment when they were being traumatized — that’s not what it’s about — it’s about everything that comes after.

C: Where was your mom in this situation?


L: Well, there were a lot of these situations back then, but she was unaware of the abuse I was experiencing too. We’re talking about the 80s. Domestic abuse and domestic violence, those were home issues — they have to sort it out themselves at home. Cops only started turning out to domestic violence reports in the late 80s, it’s relatively new. Prior to that, the idea was that it was people’s own personal issue.


Actually, my court case, I think it set some sort of legal precedent in Australia (as far as award and conviction). I think we just happened to get a representative who was really ambitious.


Prior to last year, when I had the breakdown [and underwent EMDR memory therapy] I could pretty much not remember a single thing from my childhood. Mum was beaten a lot. I was between the ages of three and seven, so my memories are pretty vague. My sister actually thinks this went on for longer, possibly since I was an infant. But when it sort of became clear that I was being abused, it took about a year for something to happen. Also, there was no phone number to call with this sort of thing (early 80s, remember). So I think [Mum] tells the story of when she realized it was true — I sympathize with the fact that you don’t want to believe your husband’s been molesting your kid — she realized she had to do something about it. I remember a story about her having to like climb over a back fence even to get into the place to report this, in fear of being seen by — we were in a small town, I don’t remember, but it was something like that. So it was difficult for her to even get to the place of reporting, not to mention the act of doing it. Given his general behaviour, I don’t think the sexual abuse came as much of a surprise.


When [she reported it], that’s when the family sort of exploded and Dad wasn’t allowed to see me anymore, which was great because it meant that Mum wasn’t getting beaten every day, but it also added another layer of turmoil, which is kidnapping. Literal kidnapping. Yeah, I don’t even know where I’d begin. I do remember a couple things, like he’d drive down, put me in his car, and I hated him. One thing I’ve realized recently is that I’ve actually never had any love for him. There are children who visit their serial killer parents in prison because they still love them. I just don’t have any connection to him; I think it’s all just got to do with the fact I’ve never thought anything of him.


So we also had to go into hiding a lot.


C: Like, by the government?


L: Yeah, the police, because Dad would lose his shit and try to find us. And he would find us. Sometimes.


I have very vivid memories of those times.


C: What would he do?


L: So the one I remember [the most vividly] is us being in a safehouse, and I remember this in an extremely sensorial way, like the color of the phone cord. Phones used to have cords on them if you didn’t know.


C: I remember. [Laughs]

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L: [Laughs] So it was in this house, and there was no furniture, and he turned up. Mum was like, “What the? Oh my god!” And she just immediately started calling the cops. I remember the car he was in — model, make, color — everything he was wearing. Like it’s just so vivid. And he had a gas can and in the other hand, a lighter. He was just screaming and he was like, “If you don’t come out, I’m going to burn the place down!” So I mean, it was really scary, and Mum was crying, hysterical, on the phone with the cops. They ended up arresting him. I can remember all of that. I was holding Mum’s leg, looking out, [motions] phone cord right in front of me. I remember looking at the wire of window mesh, and seeing him standing there with a gas can, screaming.


So that would happen now and then, stuff like that.


C: So, the authorities couldn’t hold him? Or what?


L: Yeah. I mean that still happens these days when it comes to domestic violence. You have to have proof. It’s a long, long process to have anything done.


C: Especially back then.


L: Yeah. I think my mum did a really good job of getting stuff done about it. I mean, he had a criminal record because of it, i think. By this stage of life, the cops knew my dad just from around town and other shit. He was a fucking idiot, not just inside the house. He would do stupid stuff in public. And the cops also just hated him.


C: Was he like a drunk? An alcoholic around town?


L: Never drank in his entire life. He was just a sociopath. There was even a time where my sister was like sixteen and one of her boyfriends got drunk and tried to get into her window. Like he was a really nice guy, but was trying to get to her room. And I think my mum heard something and called the cops and they just immediately came and tackled this guy, thinking it was him. Poor guy. But Dad sort of got driven out of town.


C: So you all have the same dad, right?


L: Yeah.


C: Was there ever a time where it was good?


L: Yes, yeah there was. But when I was born, it started changing. I’m not sure why. A lot of the issues I’ve had with my own mental health have been because my entire life, I’ve connected my arrival into the world with my family being destroyed — and that’s a pretty difficult thing to process, but that’s the way you process things as a kid. Unless you address it, it doesn’t change, and that becomes the way you think for the rest of your life. There have been times, in deep depression, where I’ve been absolutely convinced that my family would prefer it if I was dead. So it’s that type of thinking.


C: And your family, have they ever treated you that way?


L: No, they treat me the opposite. They are extremely protective, caring, everything. I’ve got absolutely no reason to think the way I did, but that’s just the way my brain was trained. And I think that’s something people don’t realize — depression isn’t always a chemical imbalance. That’s valid in some people, sure, but in some cases it’s got a lot to do with things that happened during the time when your brain was developing in a certain way.


For instance, when Dad used to beat Mum, they were pretty full-on beatings. They weren’t just slaps in the face, [they were] full punches to the whole body, but never the face. That’s common, because the face is evidence. So, full punches, and then — after she would drop to the ground — kicks to her whole body. So my sister would be there screaming.


C: He wouldn’t even do this in private?

L: Well, it was private. It was in the house. And I mean yeah, who knows what happened when we weren’t actually there? But he also didn’t care, so.


My sister would be screaming for him to stop — she thought that Mum was going to die. I mean these beatings were like, brutal. My sister would try to call the police, and then Dad would be like, “If you touch that phone, I’m going to come and get you next.” And I was probably two or three years old then, maybe younger.


Most of the time, I was in Mum’s arms while this was happening.


C: Oh my god.


L: Yeah, so from very early on...it’s probably the most traumatic thing that can happen to a human at that age is being in their mother’s arms while she is being brutally beaten. I mean, at that age, everything is your mum. She’s screaming and trying to protect me. Sometimes my sister was able to get me off of her, but it was this instinctual protection thing. Your first question is like, “Why was she holding onto her baby while this was happening?” But that’s just what parents do. So sometimes my sister would be able to get me and she’d take me to another room and I remember those moments. She would rub my back and stuff, or try to get me to sleep. I was hysterical, though, we both usually were. [It was] also traumatic for my sister — at that age I didn’t understand the concept of death — but my sister, she was early teens.


C: That’s fucking crazy,


L: She thought my mum was being beaten to death. And this happened not once, not twenty times, I’m sure this happened a hundred times. So it’s affected us in different ways.


For me, I was at the age where the fight or flight, wrong or right, and blame part of your brain, the amygdala, was developing. That part of the brain is in development. When your fight or flight fucking chemicals, or whatever, are being pumped to the absolutely fullest, I just feel like that stays with you. It does something to the growth. Also, in situations where there’s constant threat of violence [over years], it adds a whole other layer of trauma - the anticipation of a violent episode - walking on eggshells, and the self-blame that you naturally inflict on yourself. This is like a science that I’ve only just discovered in the last several years. It’s called Complex PTSD.


People with PTSD, their bodies remember things. But when it happens to you when you’re a child...it’s like baking a muffin and halfway through you poke a hole in it. The hole stays there, it stops that part from developing. It’s the same with your brain.


So I’ve had a lot of coping difficulties. Because that part of my brain doesn't work properly. And when someone with PTSD gets triggered, it’s because like as soon as they hear a gunshot or something that part of the brain goes, “Alright! Time to go!”


All my life up, until I grew and got tall, if a man — like a teacher or something — ever yelled at me, my legs would go numb, which is pretty scary! So that’s what happens, it really interferes with your coping mechanisms for the rest of your life. Not to mention your sense of self-worth. When you’re a kid, you think that stuff is your fault. You can’t help it, that’s just what kids do. That has had pretty significant effects on my life.


For me, every day — well not every day, I have really good days, and now I’m generally pretty good — it’s a fight. It’s a fight to stop telling myself that I shouldn’t be here, because my brain with everything is immediately like, “You’re fucking this up. Bad things are going to happen.” You know what I mean?


C: Yeah.


L: So yeah. That’s a very short version of the story, but that’s some of it. And it leads to how I cope with things as an adult. It’s extremely relevant [to my behavior as an adult].

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"You can apply compassion to everything, but most importantly you have to apply it to yourself." 

"You can apply compassion to everything, but most importantly you have to apply it to yourself." 

"You can apply compassion to everything, but most importantly you have to apply it to yourself." 

"You can apply compassion to everything, but most importantly you have to apply it to yourself." 

"You can apply compassion to everything, but most importantly you have to apply it to yourself." 

C: Yeah. How do you think it affects how you treat other people? I feel like growing up with something like this, you can go one of two ways. But what I’ve experienced of you, you are very gentle with people. But with some people it goes the complete opposite direction.


L: Yeah, it does.


C: I’m sure this is simplifying it, which I don’t mean to do, but it seems as though you put all the anger, on yourself rather than taking it out on others.


L: Yeah, the anger is turned inwards. And that’s what depression is in a lot of ways. It’s really as simple as that. It’s the dark wolf. You know? An agressive, self-hating wolf, turned inwards. But yeah, and you’re right, it does go both ways. Statistically, I shouldn’t even be alive. Statistically, people that have experienced that caliber of trauma have overdosed or committed suicide. I mean the statistics are insane. We’re like 3000% more likely to suffer depression, anxiety, suicidal tendencies, all that stuff. But I’ve got such a good family behind me, that was just never going to happen.


It’s not easy.


C: And you really never had an example of what love should look like, romantically, between to people. Unless your mom got remarried, or…


L: Yeah, never. And my mum was very loving, but she was also very traumatized. So preteen, adolescence for me, those years weren’t easy for her either. She was severely depressed, very poor, she couldn’t hold up a job, and my brothers and sisters had all gone away to cities. But at the same time, she’s really intelligent, she’s really tough, she’s an extremely good example. I get all of my understanding of compassion, and principles in general, from her. She’s very much one of those people that’s like, “That person is doing a bad thing, but they’re probably going through hell.” Or, “That someone is worse off than us.” She’s pretty incredible. She also then turned her life around, went back to school, became a college professor, got married, and is now…awesome.


C: I just think it’s crazy you were able to have successful relationships in your adult life. Like you’ve been married before, you’ve fallen in love with people. How does your past affect that? And like, you’re in a successful relationship now.


L: I’ve always had really good relationships. I’m not an aggressive person. I don’t have that in me. I actually can’t get really aggressive. A lot of that is probably fear or something. But I’ve had really good relationships, yeah. I’ve had the world of psychotherapy tell me that’s called codependence cause I’ve always had to have someone. It’s hard for me to be alone; I especially can’t sleep alone. So maybe my good relationships are just me really wanting to maintain comfort for myself, and I’m pretty high maintenance too, emotionally.


C: I mean…aren’t we all?


L: Yeah. [Laughs]


C: I have PTSD too. I was diagnosed halfway through college. I can’t relate to what you went through, but the people I’ve dealt with were, in their own ways, extremely abusive and manipulative. I can’t even imagine what your sister went though. I feel like as a woman, what I went through and how I processed it was so interesting. I’m getting older and I still haven’t even started unpacking some things — especially because I went right into another relationship after I was assaulted in college. It was putting a bandaid over a gunshot wound, essentially. Now I have to go back and face some things.


L: You were older, but you were still developing cognitively. It really does have...permanent is the wrong way to put it, because the brain is elastic, you can change it, but it enters programming in as it’s developing. That’s why people end up becoming drug addicts. It’s very, very serious to abuse people. It is a serious crime because you are affecting people and how they deal with every single thing for the rest of their life. You know? It’s not just like that moment when they were being traumatized — that’s not what it’s about — it’s about everything that comes after.


I still have to take medication for my nightmares. [My girlfriend] Savannah still has to wake me up two or three times a week because I am screaming at the top of my lungs. I’ve never known anything different than that. I’m 37 years old. That’s my dad’s fault, 100 percent.


C: You’ve made worlds of progress, mental health-wise in the last couple of years. Wouldn’t you say?


L: Oh yeah. I’m almost a different person I think. I’ve always been calm, but I’m even a bit calmer. Also, when you go through the kind of depression where you’re seriously contemplating suicide, you never want to go back there. That is a hell that you cannot describe. So you’ve got to make progress. What’s the alternative? I don’t want to go back there. The science of psychotherapy has developed leaps and bounds, but there was one point last year, I was getting intravenous ketamine injections.


C: What does that mean?


L: I think it’s like a modern alternative to shock therapy. It’s something that restarts your brain — your prefrontal cortex. It does something, they actually don’t know exactly what it does, but they know it works. I was suicidal and that was the next step; I wasn’t responding to medication therapy.


C: Yeah, tell me a little bit about what happened last year.


L: It was burnout from my work. So I can’t really tie that back to too much. It was plain and simple burnout. One of the habits you have as someone who’s experienced trauma is you avoid situations where you might be triggered. So with my divorce and stuff, I’d already had pretty significant abandonment issues cause I had a father who didn’t…like me. [Laughs] And left. Well, not left, but you know what I mean. So I’ve got the abandonment issues. Like okay, why doesn’t my dad love me? That’s pretty weird — most people, their dads love them. Then for someone else who I thought loved me, them being like, “No, I don’t anymore.” It’s like huh, this is a pattern here. [Laughs] Maybe I’m unlovable.


So I focused everything into work. Brought on a big team, which you know about that.


C: Myself included.


L: Yeah, and I just crashed. I crashed really hard. And then everything came up.


C: From your childhood?


L: Yeah, but also coping with things is a challenge for me. But just having to get through that everyday is hard, so I was shelving a lot of stuff. Anything that was going to bring on some sort of anxiety or the threat of potential failure or something, I would just ignore it. Then it just all came down.


It started off as burnout [and then] it just brought up some things. So while I was vulnerable, while my body had shut down my brain and took over, everything else came up. I had to have conversations with my sister and my mum about things. It’s also just the sort of thing you do when you’re going through treatment; they [trauma therapists] like that shit.


C: And didn’t you go away into some sort of treatment?

L: Yeah for three months. That’s where, if it weren’t for [my employee] Madeline, my business wouldn’t exist.


C: And not even that — she’s a great collaborator and coworker, but like, it scared her. She cares for you. You know? That’s lucky.


L: She’s not the kind of person who takes compliments well, she doesn’t like that. So I don’t want to make her uncomfortable, but I can’t actually underemphasize how highly I think of her. She’s just a champion. Who does that? Who sticks around? Like when I went into treatment, I was expecting to just get back and the company would be shut down and I’d file for bankruptcy. That was just it. I had to get healthy; I was going to be dead within months if I didn’t do something, so the business took a backseat. And then I turn back up and the business is still running? That’s pretty fucking insane. Don’t tell her I said that.


C: [Laughs]


L: And I don’t want to get into gender stuff, but I just can’t imagine a guy doing something like that. There’s this protective — women just have those qualities somehow, instinctively. It’s like picking up a child and protecting it. You know? She’s a very special person.


But back to treatment and stuff. I’d prefer not to have demons and not have to fight all the time, but I am who I am because of what I went though. I’d like to have some freedom in my mind, which I don’t know if I ever will have., but I wouldn’t swap it. I’d probably be pretty dull. [Laughs] Who the fuck knows? I’d probably be an accountant — not to discredit accountants.

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C: Well, one thing I wanted to ask — I’ve asked everyone on l’Odet this question too, or at least some variation of it. What would you say to someone who’s had something happen to them and they don’t know how to share it or overcome it? What would you have advice for in that way?


L: There’s a number of things. I think compassion, having compassion, is probably the most important thing. It’s the most important thing a human being can learn: compassion for other people, or anything, an event, an experience, a decision. You know? You can apply compassion to everything, but most importantly you have to apply it to yourself. You aren’t going to get very far until you do. You have to realize that yes, you’re flawed, but you’re worth something. Survivors of abuse really struggle with self-worth. That’s one of the reasons why abuse is such a serious crime. You take self-worth away from someone and there’s not much more you can take from them. The way you get that worth back is through self-compassion.


You also have to address things, you have to, through therapy or whatever. And that stems from compasion, too — stepping outside of what happened to you helps you see rationally — and then address it.


Yeah, I’d say compassion is the single most important quality a human being can have.


C: So do you believe in emotional support animals now that you have your dog, Scott?


L: Fuck yeah! Christ yeah! He makes me smile every day. I get when people are like [rolls eyes] dogs. I get that, they’re not humans, but he is the only thing in this world capable of guaranteeing that I will smile and laugh out loud every single day of my life. There aren’t drugs that can do that. That’s pretty magical. That’s not just a dog, that’s something pretty magical I reckon.

 

L: He’s just the best.


C: Him and Savannah , I’m sure, have been important for you these last couple years.


L: Sav…she’s a soldier. It hasn’t been easy on her.


C: It can’t be easy on someone to go through that with someone else.


L: You sort of have to understand things academically too. As a partner who cares for someone who is going through these things, Savannah made every effort. She did research, she read books. She told me things sometimes that I didn’t know about why I was feeling a certain way. She booked all my appointments, she did everything. She communicated with Madeline about the businesses. I was completely debilitated with anxiety and she was everything. She’s the one who talked to my family and told them I wasn’t dead. [Laughs] She makes sure I maintain these things too. On top of all these things, she makes sure I feel loved all the time. That’s a big role.


C: You have some pretty outstanding women in your life.


L: Fucking oath. Like left, right, and center. Yes. I’ve been lucky.


C: Well, thanks for sharing everything.


L: Sorry if I talked too much.


C: You didn’t. [Laughs] And I feel like you don’t need me to tell you that you’re in a really good place. That’s a victory.


L: I also need to remind myself that I’m extremely fortunate for so many reasons. Yeah, these things have happened to me, but I’m not living as a victim. I have everything I need. I just don’t want to come across as “poor me.”


C: I don’t think you do. And I think this platform...that’s something I’ve grappled with since I started it. What keeps me up at night is people looking at me and being like, “You’re an idiot. What happened to you is not that bad.” But on the other end of things, there is no spectrum of trauma. You can’t judge someone else’s for not being “bad enough.”


L: Yeah, absolutely. You become affected by trauma without your consent when you experience it. It’s not your choice what happened to you. Your soul has been breached by something, and eventually it’s going to come back out. You can work with it, understand it, try to be less affected by it. But even if it’s a tiny thing that happened, that doesn’t matter. It happened.

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Have you been to Midnight Woman? That's our sister. Submit anonymously here.

For general inquiries, please contact us at hello@midnight-woman.com

 

For advertising opportunities, please write to us at goldie@midnight-woman.com

 

Have you been to Midnight Woman? That's our sister.

Midnight Woman is an online platform that welcomes contributors of all kinds to submit personal experiences anonymously.

We aim to redefine the way we talk about what's happened to us, no matter the subject. l'Odet exists for the named to encourage the nameless.

Midnight Woman is an online platform that welcomes contributors of all kinds to submit personal experiences.

We aim to redefine the way we talk about what's happened to us, no matter the subject. L'Odet exists for the named to encourage the nameless.